Curious about Curiosity

University of Southern California neuroscientist Irving Biederman has described humans as, “designed to be ‘nfovores,’ creatures that devour information.” This omnipresent behavior has led researchers from multiple disciplines towards understanding curiosities existence & application. To read more about major research projects that have attempted to elucidate the genesis and benefits of curiosity please find the Natural History link below.

 

Read the Natural History Article Here

Imbuing Robots with Curiosity

Computer scientists are programming machines to be curious, learning to explore their surroundings and be inquisitive.

George Konidaris, computer scientist at the Intelligent Robot Lab at Brown University told Science: “Developing curiosity is a problem that’s core to intelligence. It’s going to be most useful when you’re not sure what your robot is going to have to do in the future.”

Read the Science article here

 

Curiosity and Bioengineering at UPenn

A new collaboration between the Center for Curiosity and the Department of Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania informs STEAM initiatives, hosts a symposium on “The Network Neuroscience of Curiosity,” and refocuses pedagogy on curiosity and creativity.
Speakers at the fall symposium on The Network Neuroscience of Curiosity include Dr. Danielle Bassett, Dr. David Danks (Carnegie Mellon University), Dr. Jacqueline Gottlieb (Columbia University), and Dr. Celeste Kidd (University of Rochester). The long-term project has also started conversations around reinvigorating the Bioengineering curriculum with an emphasis on student curiosity and creativity.
For more information, see

Global Study on Curiosity in the Workplace

Although 8 in 10 employees say curiosity is an important work trait, just one in five say they are curious, according to an international stugy by Merck. “Innovation and technological progress do not appear out of the blue. They always develop out of a person’s sense of curiosity about something new. Scientific curiosity and the joy of discovery are thus our most important resources when it comes to finding answers to global challenges such as the aging of our society or population growth,” says Stefan Oschmann, Chairman of the Executive Board and CEO of Merck. “That’s why curiosity should be a key aspect of our everyday work.”

Read the State of Curiosity Report here.

Curiosity at Core of Human Existence

Dr Paul C Holinger writes in Psychology  Today that curiosity is at the core of human existence. “The human brain is stimulus-seeking. We want to enhance the interest affect, our curiosity, in order to learn, to discover, to adapt…. The responses of caregivers to infants and children can either enhance interest or constrict it. Similarly, later in life, teachers or bosses can stimulate or restrict interest and curiosity. Creativity and discoveries come from curiosity—that is, interest-excitement. Reactions such as fear, or surprise, or disgust can be shifted to interest, thus enhancing learning.”

Read the complete article in Psychology Today here.